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Bob Tisdale, Climate Science, Donna Laframboise, General Topics, Hypocrisy, IPCC, Loony Toons, MSM, Settled science?, These items caught my eye, Wildlife Conservation, Windfarms

These items caught my eye – 19 November 2013

1: How Rare was the November Midwest Tornado Outbreak?; 2: Polar bear problems in N Hudson Bay not due to late freeze-up; 3: Why do sceptics put up with cyber bullying?; 4:On Cowtan and Way (2013) “Coverage bias in the HadCRUT4 temperature series and its impact on recent temperature trends”; 5: Beddington’s “Extreme Weather” Is Just Normal After All; 6: Should the Precautionary Principle Shut Down Wind Turbines?; 7: Recent Energy and Environmental News; 8: Today’s Climate Summit Press Conferences; 9: Shale gas potential delays new natural gas pipeline under the Baltic; 10: BBC responds to complaint – receives another; Please remember to read the comments, as the information (and the links) contained in them often put the main article into context..
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How Rare was the November Midwest Tornado Outbreak?

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Paul Homewood

A bit of perspective from Accuweather, with the help of SPC’s Greg Carbin and Harold Brooks of NSSL.

In the wake of the deadly Midwest tornado outbreak on Sunday, many people are wondering how rare tornadoes are during November.

The short answer is that tornadoes can occur in the Midwest during any month of the year. However, the number of tornadoes diminishes substantially during the cold-weather months.

There is a secondary severe weather season that occurs during October and November, which favors the Deep South.

While rare, tornadoes reaching as far north as the Midwest and mid-Atlantic are not unheard of during November. Occasionally, a small number of the tornadoes can be rather strong. – Click here to read the full article
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Polar bear problems in N Hudson Bay not due to late freeze-up

Posted on November 19, 2013 by polar bear science

The myth that northern Hudson Bay communities are having problems with polar bears this year because freeze-up is later than usual just won’t go away.

I discussed the well publicized craziness in Churchill last week (here and here), but there’s more. Polar bears are already leaving the shore of Northern Hudson Bay as the ice rapidly forms but I saw a story yesterday (dated late last week) that quoted a local official in Repulse Bay blaming their polar bear problems on late freeze-up.

I’ve written before about the peer-reviewed paper by polar bear researchers Seth Cherry and colleagues published earlier this year on breakup and freeze-up dates between 1991 and 2009. But perhaps the freeze-up data needs more emphasis. I’ve copied that graph again below, with notes, and added some ice maps. See for yourself. – Click here to read the full article
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Why do sceptics put up with cyber bullying?

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Scottish Sceptic

Because sceptics are culturally resistant to seeing themselves as victims.

Sceptics are loners … not social loners but intellectual loners. We do not need our views endorsed by our peers. We are resilient, self-reliant we have often worked in time-critical high-risk industries where the pressure of work means that tempers can fly and so we are pragmatic and tolerant of others. – Click here to read the full article
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On Cowtan and Way (2013) “Coverage bias in the HadCRUT4 temperature series and its impact on recent temperature trends”

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Bob Tisdale

INTRODUCTION

The recent paper by Cowtan and Way (2013) Coverage bias in the HadCRUT4 temperature series and its impact on recent temperature trends made the rounds in the climate change blogosphere. Posts at RealClimate (here) and at SkepticalScience (here) looked on the paper as the second coming of…errr…Hansen’s GISTEMP maybe, saying Cowtan and Way (2013) proved the UKMO HADCRUT4 data underreports by half the warming of global surface temperatures since 1997. The posts at WattsUpWithThat (here) and at Judith Curry’s blog (here) weren’t so flattering, to put it mildly. Lucia at her blog TheBlackboard had three posts (here, here and here.) Lucia spoke favorably about Cowtan and Way (2013), but offered in a comment (here):

That said: We do need to put the changes in context of testing models, and they don’t make a big difference. Models still look pretty bad, though maybe a tiny bit less bad. If the models are bad we can be pretty confident the divergence will increase over time — though it might take longer. OTOH: if the models are ok, the divergence will correct itself. Observing this puts us exactly where we were before C&W was published!

And Steve McIntyre’s post (here) illustrated the apparent 2005 breakpoint in his Figure 2. I’ll discuss in this post why that’s odd, among other things. – Click here to read the full article
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Beddington’s “Extreme Weather” Is Just Normal After All

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Paul Homewood

Sir John Beddington, the UK government’s then outgoing Chief Scientist, gave a series of interviews last March, claiming that climate change meant the likelihood of more extreme weather in the UK. He particularly had in mind the run of cold winters experienced in recent years. For instance, in this interview with ITV News: – Click here to read the full article
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Should the Precautionary Principle Shut Down Wind Turbines?

Posted on November 18, 2013 by Keith Kloor

In 2012 Scientific American asked:

Are Wind Turbines Getting More Bird and Bat-Friendly?

In case you weren’t aware, wind energy has an ecological downside that’s hasn’t yet been smoothed out. As AP reporter Dina Cappiello wrote earlier this year, “the green industry is allowed to do not so green things”:

It kills protected species with impunity and conceals the environmental consequences of sprawling wind farms.

More than 573,000 birds are killed by the country’s wind farms each year, including 83,000 hunting birds such as hawks, falcons and eagles, according to an estimate published in March in the peer-reviewed Wildlife Society Bulletin.Click here to read the full article

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Recent Energy and Environmental News

Posted on November 19, 2013 by John Droz Jr

The latest Energy and Environmental Newsletter is now available online.

The Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions (AWED) is an informal coalition of more than 10,000 individuals and organizations interested in improving government energy & environmental policies. Our basic position is that technical matters like these should be addressed by using Real Science. It’s all spelled out at WiseEnergy.org, which is an exceptional collection of helpful resources.

A key element of AWED’s efforts is public education. Towards that end, every 3 weeks we put together a newsletter to balance what is found in the mainstream media about energy and environmental matters. We appreciate MasterResource for their assistance in publishing this information.

Some special gems in this issue:Click here to read the full article
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Today’s Climate Summit Press Conferences

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Donna Laframboise

I reported yesterday that green activists play an institutionalized role at climate summits – summits that are supposed to be negotiating sessions between sovereign nations.

Unlike the public – which is barred from attending the currently-in-progress Warsaw summit – these activists are permitted to set up booths and to distribute mountains of literature/green propaganda. They are given ample opportunity to lobby delegates one-on-one, and to schmooze with the international press corps. – Click here to read the full article
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Shale gas potential delays new natural gas pipeline under the Baltic

Posted on November 19, 2013 by The k2p blog

It will be slower than in the US, but shale gas will also be a game changer in Europe. Even though Russia has huge reserves of shale gas and shale oil, they would also prefer that the transition to shale gas should not go too fast. They have so much invested in the Natural Gas infrastructure that they need to keep the sales of natural gas going to ensure a return. Gazprom has the enviable dilemma of protecting an existing revenue stream by preventing the too rapid establishment of another revenue stream. One problem for Gazprom of course is that shale gas is much more widespread across Europe and their virtual monopoly with Siberian natural gas will be threatened. – Click here to read the full article
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BBC responds to complaint – receives another

Posted on November 18, 2013 by tallbloke

The BBC’s Leanne Bennett has (inadequately) responded to my complaint about their 28gate climate reportage bias, failing to address the points I raised. Needless to say the email came from an address which doesn’t accept replies.

Dear Mr Tattersall
Reference CAS-2387218-M1MZXX
Thanks for contacting us.
We understand you believe the BBC’s reporting on climate change is biased.
The BBC is committed to impartial and balanced coverage when it comes to this issue.

There’s broad scientific agreement on the issue of climate change and we reflect this accordingly; however, we do aim to ensure that we also offer time to the dissenting voices.Click here to read the full article

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